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Car Leasing Avon

CAR LEASING AVON

Throughout the Avon area, we can offer a great car leasing service, we have found that the type of car required is as varied as the area, so whether it is a SUV, Saloon or a nifty run around we can help you. Not forgetting our van drivers, we can find the one that suits your daily personal or business needs.

Leaseline is family run and owned company, we pride ourselves on providing an honest straight forward service, finding you the best price for the vehicle you want.

ABOUT AVON

The area that is called Avon, which consists of Bath, North East Somerset, the City of Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire, used to be the county of Avon. From 1974 until 1996 this area was a ceremonial county in the west of England. Gaining its name from the river that defined the historic boundary between Gloucestershire and Somerset. The mouth of the River Avon became part of the County of the Town of Bristol in 1373.

Avon was formed based on the election of 1970; the Conservative party introduced a two-tier system of counties. Despite the opposition of Somerset County Council and the ‘Save Our Somerset’ campaign, the bill received royal assent on 26th October 1972. The demise of the county of Avon came on 1st April 1996. This dissolved Avon into four authorities: The City and County of Bristol, Bath and North East Somerset, South Gloucestershire and North Somerset.

There is a great legacy attached to Avon. Many companies and public bodies still use the name of the old county. The four new counties cooperate on some issues but there is no longer a joint council. This doesn’t prevent there being many public services which extend over the entire Avon county area. Some even refer to the area as CUBA (County that Used to Be Avon). In a BBC One programme ‘Inside Out West’, the investigation was made why the term ‘Avon’ refuses to die out.

Other legacies are the Forest of Avon, which spans over all four of the local authorities. The Avon Cycleway, a circular route made up of 85 miles of less-frequented roads and cycle tracks, served as a building block for the National Cycle Network.

Avon is a large area in South West England. The centre of which is the City of Bristol which is close to the mouth of the Avon River. This river use to be the defining boundary between the two old counties of Somerset and Gloucestershire. Bristol became its own county in 1373 when it became the County of the Town of Bristol. The county of Avon only officially existed between 1974 and 1996, it was joined together by many different smaller unitary counties: County boroughs of Bristol and Bath, part of the administrative county of Gloucestershire (The urban districts Kingswood and Mangotsfield, and the rural districts: Warmley, Sodbury and most of Thornbury.) and finally part of the administrative county of Somerset (Municipal borough of Weston-Super-Mare, urban districts: Clevedon, Keynsham, Norton-Radstock, Portishead and the rural districts: Bathavon, Long Ashton, part of Axbridge and part of Clutton.)

Officially brought into place on 26th October 1972, Avon became the new county. There was some protest, notably from the Somerset County Council but this failed to prevent the formation of Avon. This only lasted until 1st April 1996 when the six subsections of Avon were separated into four counties. The counties were: The City and County of Bristol, Bath and North East Somerset (formed from the Bath and Wansdyke districts), South Gloucestershire (which was formed from Kingswood and Northavon districts) and North Somerset (which was the Woodspring district).

The name of Avon has endured these changes. Companies such as the Avon Wildlife Trust, have kept the name of Avon alive. BBC One aired a programme in 2006, Inside Out West, which explored why the name Avon is still in use. Although there is technically no singular council, the four unitary authorities still cooperate on many policies. Sometimes the term ‘Severnside’ is used for this area, but the term Avon covers a larger area than the name Severnside suggests.